miércoles, 29 de julio de 2015

Some thoughts about Lobo Annual #1

Lobo will need to deal with one of his biggest challenges yet.

Someone wants Sinestro's head and such person has hired Lobo for the job. However, there's more than it seems about this whole situation and Lobo will soon learn that he might have been manipulated.

Well, this Annual continues the same problems from every frikking issue from this series.

Cullen Bunn delivers a story without any semblance of style nor uniqueness. Lobo continues to be one of the most unlikable protagonists that you can find in any comic, not really because he committs terrible acts (which he does) but because of a severe lack of personality, charm and wit. The character is not really enjoyable to read about.

Worst of all, the narration boxes are so goddamn abundant that is getting asphyxiating. They're so prominent that they get pretty repetitive and they offer so little in terms of distinctiveness that you can simply skip them and you won't miss anything about the story. Not only that but they also make Lobo take himself way too seriously and for that reason, he's not fun to watch.

The surprise at the end, is not that much of a surprise all things considered but it was still kinda interesting.

Robson Rocha is in charge of the art and his work is by far the best aspect of thi story thanks to good looking characters, rich environments and solid storytelling.

Other than that, you can safely skip this. Nothing valuable whatsoever.

10 comentarios:

  1. While I respect your opinion, I think it's kind of unfair to say that it lacks a "style" or that this Lobo lacks "personality" - there definitely is a style and personality, it's just not something that's to your liking/taste.

    I kind of like this issue. The bits where he talks about the blackness of space and about madness, both his own and that of the criminal elements that he's a part of, is pretty evocative. I really liked one panel where it depicts Lobo's face giving off a smug sneer as it seemingly blends in with the starry background behind him, almost as if implying that the darkness surrounding the stars and Lobo himself are this singular sinister being.

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    1. Well yeah, I can just express my opinion about it and sadly I don't find anything particularly interesting about this.

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    2. I didn't mean to sound pushy, nor was I trying to change your opinion. I'm sorry if I came across that way to you.

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    3. I was only noting my objections to those claims.

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    4. Hey no prob, as I said is okay to disagree with my opinion.

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    5. Even though we both disagree on things, I think you're a pretty cool guy. Thank you for being open and honest about things.

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  2. I see a lot of fans comparing the character to Deadpool, but to me it's like comparing apples to oranges. Personally, I think the truth is that fans want Lobo to be like Deadpool, a character who can be simultaneously comedic, tragic, horrifying but heroic and ultimately redeemable (even if there are times where he's pretty crude/scummy). What do you think?

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    1. It's true that fans have certainly created their own vision about what they want from Lobo. They want it to be a comedic, over the top portrayal (although I wouldn't really say redeemable since that's not that point) so they will most certainly get a bit defensive about anything that is different.

      I personally would be okay with this more serious direction if only there was something more unique about it.

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    2. The reason why I brought up "redeemable" is because for all his faults Deadpool is ultimately redeemable, which is partially probably why he's so popular in the first place. Everyone likes to have a character who can be redeemed.

      The comparison with Lobo kind of annoys me. Lobo as a character was intentionally designed and written to be repulsive and hated by the reader. In fact, the character was so repulsive that even his own creator, Keith Giffen, swore him off.

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  3. "the narration boxes are so goddamn abundant that is getting asphyxiating. They're so prominent that they get pretty repetitive and they offer so little in terms of distinctiveness that you can simply skip them and you won't miss anything about the story."

    I don't really have a problem with them. In terms of writing and tone, it kind of has a kind of hard-boiled space noir-type of feel, which kind of works given the character. Guess it's just a question of personal preference.

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